Category: TCS Website Reviews

Review of Jennifer Robertson – Robo Sapiens Japanicus: Robots, Gender, Family, and The Japanese Nation

Posted on December 11th, 2018 by TCS

Mona Abaza reviews Jennifer Robertson’s book ‘Robo Sapiens Japanicus: Robots, Gender, Family, and The Japanese Nation’.

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Review of Elizabeth Goodstein, Georg Simmel and the Disciplinary Imaginary

Posted on October 19th, 2018 by TCS

Mark Featherstone reviews Elizabeth Goodstein’s book ‘Georg Simmel and the Disciplinary Imaginary’

Review of Samuel Burgum, Occupying London: Post Crash Resistance and the Limits of Possibility

Posted on October 9th, 2018 by TCS

Pete Bearder reviews Samuel Burgum’s “Occupying London: Post Crash Resistance and the Limits of Possibility.”

Review of Kehinde Andrews, Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for the 21st Century

Posted on September 10th, 2018 by TCS

Gabriel Apata reviews Andrews’s “Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for the 21st Century”.

Review of Ali Rattansi, Bauman and Contemporary Sociology

Posted on July 18th, 2018 by TCS

Katy Wright reviews Rattansi’s book “Bauman and Contemporary Sociology.”

Review of Vicky Kirby (ed.), What if Culture Was Nature All Along?

Posted on June 29th, 2018 by TCS

Nick Mansfield reviews the book ‘What if Culture was Nature All Along?’, edited by Vicky Kirby

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Review of Matthew Watson, The Market

Posted on June 19th, 2018 by TCS

William Davies reviews Matthew Watson’s book ‘The Market’.

Review of Laurence Roulleau Berger, Post-Western Revolution in Sociology

Posted on June 15th, 2018 by TCS

Aurélien Boucher reviews “Post-Western Revolution in Sociology” by Laurence Roulleau Berger.

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Review: Feenberg, Technosystem: The Social Life of Reason

Posted on June 12th, 2018 by TCS

Review of Andrew Feenberg, Technosystem: The Social Life of Reason (Harvard University Press, 2017), 256 pages, £25.95. Reviewed by Alexander … read more

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Review: Paul Stenner, Liminality and Experience

Posted on May 31st, 2018 by TCS

Robbie Duschinsky and Samantha Reisz review Stenner’s ‘Liminality and Experience’, which develops an approach to thinking that can illuminate the future of psychosocial approaches on producing effects of in/stability.